The Outdorian Magazine - Page 32



Homecamp
Flatpack Firepit and Grill
Review
Words by Suzanne Chellingworth
Photos by Zikri Teo
H
omecamp came onto the outdoor lifestyle scene in
2014 with a buy-it-once mantra and an eye for all
things well made. As fellow supporters of quality
kit and low-impact camping, we were pretty
stoked to take their leave-no-trace firepit
for a test burn right in time for winter.
by
Good to know:
The dimensions of the grill (40cm x 45cm), while
perfect for up to four campers, mean you’re
not going to feed an army. Firewood
needs to be split pretty small for the
What we like:
Inspired
directly on the grill but you can also bung on a pan or a billy.
same reason, so you’ll need to be
simple,
open-fire
handy with a hatchet or armed with
cooking methods popular in Japan
fire bricks. It’s a bit difficult to move
and Taiwan, we love the concept
the grill up or down rungs once it’s
of a contained campfire that won’t
hot – a sturdy pair of BBQ gloves
leave ugly scars on the ground. At
could
6kg, it’s lightweight and compact
enough not just to bring on car
camping trips and picnics, but also
to campsites that may require a short
walk from parking. Like all of Homecamp’s
classically curated collection, it’s a good looking
bit of kit, too.
How it works:
The firepit consists of four stainless steel parts that pack flat
into a canvas carry bag, and come together without tools
or screws. Set up can be counted in seconds, with the main
collapsible component simply clipping into the base tray,
which stabilises the unit and catches falling ash. An airflow
plate then drops in and levels out the bottom of the pit.
We used split wood and fire starters for fuel, which proved
effective first go. Once the flames are low and the coals red
hot, on goes the grill, which has four sets of rungs that allow
you to vary the distance from the heat source. We cooked
OUTDORIAN MAGAZINE ISSUE THREE
mitigate
this,
otherwise
make sure you place the grill on the
lower rungs while it’s cold.
Yay or nay:
There will always be a time and a place
for portable gas stoves, which are undeniably
efficient and clean to use, but if you ask us, there’s nothing
quite like filling up on charred snags and gooey s’mores
while breathing fog around a campfire. And if we can do it
in a way that has minimal impact on the environment, then
it gets two sooty thumbs up from us. O

Hungry Camper

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